New Teaching Tools Available for High School and College Instructors

The Immigrant Entrepreneurship project is pleased to announce that new lesson plans and syllabi are available on the website for high-school and college-level instructors. These instructional tools utilize biographies, contextual essays, and primary-source historical content from the Immigrant Entrepreneurship project website to address important themes such as personal and collective identity, religion, business, gender, and social networks among German-American immigrants. The Aryanization of Jewish Businesses, Persecution, and Migration to America During National Socialism and Migration to America and German-Immigrant Entrepreneurship During the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries high-school-level syllabi offer educational resources for German students in advanced English and bilingual history courses and provide opportunities to improve language skills and content acquisition through the study of migration and entrepreneurship. The German-Jewish Immigrant Entrepreneurship in the United States college-level syllabus presents a thematic analysis of German-Jewish migration and business in the United States from the nineteenth century through the post-World War II era and offers biographical resources, scholarly readings, and other material that professors may utilize for teaching undergraduate-level courses in American, German, and/or Jewish history, as well as other fields such as the history of business or migration. Similarly, the Female Entrepreneurship in the United States: German-American Businesswomen from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Century syllabus examines the contributions of women, particularly German-Americans, to American businesses and the role of female education and entrepreneurship in North America and may be of use for instructors in courses on women’s history, German and/or American history, and business and migration studies. These resources are available through the Teaching Tools link in the Resources tab of the Immigrant Entrepreneurship website.